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ABSTRACT. Talk about knowledge economies is often the source of great tension for the early childhood teaching profession because of its capacity to polarize views on the kind of role economics should play in the lives of young children. In this article our interest is to show both the pedagogical impact of dominant and narrowing knowledge economy thinking, and also the creative reconceptualization of the idea of an economy to promote a culture of knowledge sharing. The article purposefully employs the idea of the knowledge economy to explore the intimate interactions that occur between early childhood centers and faculties. We are concerned with the ways that a dynamic sum of teacher knowledge forms an economy, and the pedagogical implications of this economy for the teaching and learning environment. We are interested in inclusive and participatory models of early education, focusing on the richness of sharing knowledge to enhance teaching practice between participants in early childhood communities. Furthermore, we are interested in the nature of knowledge communities in contemporary “21st-century” teaching and learning. pp. 74–91

SANDY FARQUHAR
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University of Auckland, New Zealand
ANDREW GIBBONS
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Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand
MAREK TESAR
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University of Auckland, New Zealand

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