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ABSTRACT. Struggles over the right to higher education have become increasingly entangled with a moral panic over a “crisis of masculinity” and assumptions that higher education has become “feminized.” Such assumptions have contributed to the reproduction of dualistic thinking about gender and a “battle of the sexes,” reasserting problematic constructions of masculinity/femininity and reason/emotion. This has had profound implications for higher educational cultures and practices, shaping discourses of teaching and learning. Despite this, there has been limited research attention to the relationship between gendered formations and HE pedagogies and the work/ing and mark/ing of the emotional on different gendered subjects in pedagogical space (Ahmed, 2004). This article examines the complex formations of gender at play in students’ and academics’ accounts of pedagogical relations and practices, paying particular attention to the emotional, embodied, subjective and lived experiences of teaching and leaning in HE. Drawing on qualitative data of students’ and lecturers’ pedagogical experiences from the UK Higher Education Academy funded project ‘Formations of Gender and Higher Education Pedagogies’ (Burke, Crozier et al., 2013), it examines the mis/recognition of emotion and the impact of this on gendered embodied subjectivities. pp. 52–67

Keywords: pedagogies; gendered formations; misrecognition; difference; emotion

How to cite: Burke, Penny Jane, and Gill Crozier (2014), "Higher Education Pedagogies: Gendered Formations, Mis/Recognition and Emotion," Journal of Research in Gender Studies 4(2): 52–67.


PENNY JANE BURKE
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Paulo Freire Institute-UK,
University of Roehampton, London, United Kingdom
GILL CROZIER
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Paulo Freire Institute-UK,
University of Roehampton, London, United Kingdom

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